Pharmacology and Neuroscience

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Graduate courses of study leading to the Master of Arts (M.A.), Master of Science (M.S.), and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees in Pharmacology and Neuroscience are offered by Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology. Course offerings in the graduate program have been designed so that graduate students may acquire a broad basic knowledge in Pharmacology and Neuroscience. Graduate students in the M.S. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience and Ph.D. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience programs may choose from a diversity of specializations when selecting a research advisor and a research topic. Graduate students in the M.A. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience program are not required to perform laboratory research or write a thesis. Instead, M.A. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience students will complete a capstone project for completion of their degree with the assistance of a faculty advisor, whom they select.

Admission and Application

The minimum requirement for admission to an advanced degree program in Pharmacology and Neuroscience is an undergraduate degree in one of the biological sciences. While not required, one year of physics, mathematics, and chemistry is recommended. Students may be admitted with a deficiency in this prerequisite, but it must be remedied at an accredited university that is approved by the Graduate School prior to completion of PHRM 550A and PHRM 550B. Students with undergraduate training in related areas, such as chemistry, physics, mathematics, computer science, psychology or engineering are also eligible for admission in Pharmacology and Neuroscience graduate programs.

Unrestricted admission into the M.A. and M.S. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience programs requires an undergraduate grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 ( A = 4.0). Unrestricted admission into the Ph.D. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience program requires an undergraduate GPA of 3.25 ( A = 4.0). Students entering the Ph.D. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience program may be admitted directly from a master's program.

Accelerated Entry (from a master's program) is designed for students who make an early commitment to pursuing a Ph.D. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience degree. The Pharmacology and Neuroscience Graduate Program recommends this option after the student's credentials, eligibility and performance have been reviewed. To be eligible for this option: (1) the student must have attained a 3.25 (A = 4.0) GPA in graduate course work, (2) the student must have successfully completed the core courses with a grade of B or better and (3) a research advisor with whom the student will work toward his/her degree should submit a letter of recommendation attesting to the student's ability and potential to perform doctoral research. Approval of this request must be given by the Graduate Program Committee and the Department Chair. The Chair of the Department will then request from the Graduate School a waiver of the master's degree or master's equivalency before entry into the doctoral program.

Each applicant must submit an application online at gradschool.siu.edu/apply which contains the following:

  1. A non-refundable $65 application fee. Applicants must pay this fee by credit card.
  2. Unofficial transcripts for all undergraduate and graduate coursework
  3. Copies of all diplomas.
  4. A copy of TOEFL scores (international students only).
  5. A copy of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) score.
  6. Three letters of recommendation.
  7. A Career Statement (limit to 250 words) describing the career path that the applicant intends to pursue upon completion of graduate study.
  8. A Statement of Research Interest (limit to 250 words). Identify 2-3 Pharmacology Department or cross-appointed faculty members whose research interests are most aligned with those of the applicant, as well as specific reasons for this selection. The faculty research interests can be found on the Department of Pharmacology Website. Applicants for the M.A. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience program are not required to submit this document.
  9. A resume or curriculum vitae.
  10. A copy of current passport (International Students only).
  11. A copy of current Visa (International Students only).
  12. Proof of funding for the first year (International Students applying for the M.A. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience degree only)

In addition, applicants must submit the following directly to the Pharmacology Department:

  1. Official transcripts for all undergraduate and graduate coursework sent in a sealed envelope directly from each university or college attended by the applicant.
  2. Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores sent directly from the ETS. (School code 1726; Department code 0216)
  3. TOEFL (International ONLY) score sent directly from ETS. School code (1726; Department code 0216)

Performance Requirements to Maintain Student Status

An overall GPA of 3.0 (A = 4.0) in all graduate coursework is required to remain in the M.A., M.S., and Ph.D. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience programs. Any grade below B in a Pharmacology and Neuroscience core course must be remediated by retaking the course and earning at least a B grade.

Financial Assistance

The Pharmacology and Neuroscience Graduate Program offers financial assistance that includes tuition waivers, research assistantships, and fellowships for M.S. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience and Ph.D. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience students; application for this support is made directly to the Department of Pharmacology. The department does not provide financial support to students in the M.A. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience program. The Graduate School governs limits on support.

M.S. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience and Ph.D. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience students should be aware that renewal of research assistantship or fellowship support is contingent upon satisfactory performance evaluations. Performance is documented in an annual progress report that is evaluated by the student's advisor and the Graduate Program Committee. The performance evaluation considers both assigned duties relevant to graduate assistantships and progress in coursework and research. Failure to make satisfactory progress towards the degree, as documented in the annual progress report, may lead to termination of support.

Procedures

All M.S. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience and Ph.D. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience students are required to complete core coursework that is supplemented with appropriate electives. The core courses are PHRM 501, PHRM 500 (Introduction to Seminar, Pharmacology Seminar), PHRM 550A and PHRM 550B (Principles of Pharmacology), and PHRM 577 (Neuroscience). PHRM 530 (Advanced Pharmacology and Neuroscience) is an additional core course for Ph.D. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience students. Equivalent course work completed at other institutions or in other collegiate units may be substituted for certain course requirements for graduate course work in Pharmacology and Neuroscience if approved by the Pharmacology and Neuroscience Graduate Program Committee and the Graduate School.

In accordance with the graduate school, maximum coursework for full-time graduate students is 16 credit hours per semester; 9 credit hours is considered a normal course load and 8 credit hours is the minimum for fall/spring semesters while 3 credit hours is the minimum for summer semesters. For Ph.D. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience students, after admission into candidacy, 6 credit hours is the minimum.

All graduate students must acquire training in the use of appropriate research tool(s) as required by the Graduate School. All students are required to attain competence in PHRM 540 (Responsible Conduct of Research). M.S. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience students are required to complete one additional research tool.  Ph.D. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience students are required to complete two additional research tools. Students may fulfill the requirements for a research tool by taking any of the following courses: PHRM 552 (Applied Statistics for the Basic Sciences), MBMB 504 (Research Methods), or PHRM 551 (Methods in Pharmacology). Students may also attain competence by formal training, or by demonstrating competence in another manner acceptable to the Pharmacology and Neuroscience Graduate Program Committee.

An advisory system in Pharmacology and Neuroscience will help students in planning their coursework. Upon their admission to the M.S. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience or Ph.D. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience program, the Graduate Program Director will advise students until the student chooses a research advisor. The program outlined by students, their advisors and their thesis/dissertation committees are subject to approval by the Pharmacology and Neuroscience Graduate Program Committee. The choice of advisor and the formulation of the thesis/dissertation committee is an important step and should be carefully considered. Students should choose a research advisor after completion of core coursework (including the required research tools and PHRM 551) and passage of the preliminary examination.

As soon as a graduate student has selected a research advisor and developed a thesis/dissertation project, a thesis/dissertation committee should be formed. The thesis committee for a student in the M.S. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience program will consist of a minimum of four members: the student’s research advisor (chair), two faculty members from the Department of Pharmacology and one faculty member from an outside department. The dissertation committee for a student in the Ph.D. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience program will consist of a minimum of five members: the student’s research advisor (chair), two or three faculty members from the Department of Pharmacology, and one or two faculty members from outside the department. Members of this committee should be able to contribute significantly in the area of the student’s research program. The Chair of the Department of Pharmacology and the Graduate Program Director are ex-officio members for all thesis/dissertation committees of which they are not formal members.  The student’s research advisor will submit the names of committee members to the Graduate Program Committee to ensure appropriate membership is included and will request approval of this committee from the Dean of the Graduate School.

Master of Arts (M.A.) in Pharmacology and Neuroscience

Requirements

The M.A. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience is designed for the completion of all coursework online, with the exception PHRM 551 Methods in Pharmacology, although students have the option of in-person attendance. A total of 34 credit hours at the 400- and 500-level is required for the M.A. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience degree. Of the total credit hours completed, at least 20 of these must be graded (A, B, C) hours. At least 17 of the total 34 credit hours must be 500-level courses. Of these 17, a minimum of six credit hours of PHRM 590 (Readings or Research in Pharmacology) is required. More than 6 credit hours of PHRM 590 may be taken, however only six may be counted toward the 500-level requirement. The faculty advisor will help plan course work. Students are not required to perform laboratory research or write a thesis for the M. A. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience degree. Students must pass a comprehensive exit examination upon completion of the coursework and complete a capstone project that is literature based under the direction of a faculty mentor, whom the student chooses. Credit for the capstone project occurs through PHRM 590 Readings or Research in Pharmacology.

Sample Curriculum Map

Fall Semester - 14 Credit Hours

  • PHRM 550A: Principles of Pharmacology (4 CH)
  • PHRM 577: Neuroscience (4 CH)
  • PHRM 501: Introduction to Seminar (1 CH)
  • PHRM 540: Responsible Conduct in Research (1 CH)
  • PHRM 590: Readings or Research in Pharmacology (4 CH)

Spring Semester - 14 Credit Hours

  • PHRM 550B: Principles of Pharmacology (4 CH)
  • PHRM 512: Regulatory Issues in Drug Development (2 CH)
  • PHRM 501: Introduction to Seminar (1 CH)
  • PHRM 530: Advanced Pharm. and Neurosci. (3 CH)
  • PHRM 590: Readings or Research in Pharmacology (4 CH)

Summer Semester - 6 Credit Hours

  • PHRM 551: Methods in Pharmacology (4 CH)
  • PHRM 590: Readings or Research in Pharmacology (2 CH)

Master of Science (M.S.) in Pharmacology and Neuroscience

Requirements

  1. A minimum of two-years of full-time study (one year in residence).
  2. A total of 30 credit hours at the 400 and 500 level. At least 15 of these credit hours must be in 500-level courses, of which a maximum of six credit hours should PHRM 599 (Thesis Research).
  3. Completion of core coursework with a grade of B or better in each course, completion of PHRM 540 (Responsible Conduct of Research) and completion of at least one Research Tool.
  4. A written comprehensive examination must be passed with at least a grade of B. It will be prepared, conducted and evaluated by the faculty in the Department of Pharmacology with leadership by the Graduate Program Director. Students will take this exam upon completion of the major core course work.
  5. Before significant research has begun, a thesis plan is required. The thesis plan will be presented and discussed in an informal meeting with thesis committee members. The thesis plan must be approved by the student’s thesis committee and placed in the student’s file.
  6. A thesis must be completed in the student’s research area of interest and receive approval from the student’s thesis committee. The thesis is expected to be a competent, original research project carried out in a selected area under the research advisor’s supervision. It should include a statement of the problem, an adequate review of literature, a careful analysis of results by appropriate methods and an interpretation of the findings. The student must submit a preliminary draft of the thesis to the research advisor at least 10 weeks prior to their defense. A corrected copy must be submitted to other members of the thesis committee no later than four weeks before the formal thesis defense.
  7. Each student is required to have six credit hours of PHRM 599 (Thesis Research).
  8. Results of the thesis research must be defended in a seminar that must be announced publicly in advance. Students should submit their thesis abstract to the Graduate Program Director at least two weeks prior to the thesis defense to facilitate the public announcement. Immediately following the seminar, an oral examination will be conducted by the student’s thesis committee. Any member of the University community may attend the seminar and participate in questioning and discussion, subject to reasonable time limitations imposed by the committee chair. Only committee members may participate in the oral examination that occurs after the seminar and may vote or make recommendations concerning acceptance of the thesis and the oral examination.
  9. The student will be recommended for the degree if members of the student’s thesis committee judge both the thesis and the performance at the oral examination to be satisfactory. A thesis approval form will be completed, signed by the committee and the chair of the Department of Pharmacology, and transmitted to the Graduate School. If performance at the oral examination is unsatisfactory, it may be repeated once, no sooner than three months after the first examination. A second failure will result in dismissal from the Pharmacology and Neuroscience Graduate Program. If the written thesis is unsatisfactory, the student will be allowed to revise the document and send to either the research advisor only or the whole thesis committee for review.
  10. Students who have completed all coursework and PHRM 599 research credits may register in PHRM 601 (Continuing Enrollment) until completion of the degree. Students must be registered during the semester in which they graduate.
  11. The student is responsible for electronically submitting the thesis to the Graduate School, the Graduate Program Director, and their research advisor. The Department of Pharmacology will have 3 bound copies of the thesis made: for the student, the graduate program curriculum office, and the student’s research advisor.
  12. Below is a representative schedule for completion of the requirements for the M.S. Degree in Pharmacology and Neuroscience. Students are strongly encouraged to begin research as soon as possible by taking PHRM 590 (Readings or Research in Pharmacology). In addition to the core courses, students should take one graded elective course.

Sample Curriculum Map

First Year, Fall Semester - 12 Credit Hours

  • PHRM 550A: Principles of Pharmacology (4 CH)
  • PHRM 577: Neuroscience (4 CH)
  • PHRM 501: Introduction to Seminar (1 CH)
  • MBMB 504: Research Methods (3 CH)

First Year, Spring Semester - 10 Credit Hours

  • PHRM 550B: Principles of Pharmacology (4 CH)
  • PHRM 590: Readings or Research in Pharmacology (2 CH)
  • PHRM 501: Introduction to Seminar (1 CH)
  • MBMB 530: Advanced Cellular Biology (3 CH)

First Year, Summer Semester - 6 Credit Hours

  • PHRM 551: Methods in Pharmacology (4 CH)
  • PHRM 590: Readings or Research in Pharmacology (2 CH)
  • Choose Advisor and form thesis committee
  • Preliminary Examination - Written Comprehensive Exam

Second Year, Fall Semester - 12 Credit Hours

  • PHRM 501: Introduction to Seminar (1 CH)
  • PHRM 552: Applied Statistics (3 CH)
  • PHRM 590: Readings or Research in Pharmacology (4 CH)
  • PHRM 599: Thesis Research (3 CH)
  • PHRM 540: Responsible Conduct of Research (1 CH)

Second Year, Spring Semester - 10 Credit Hours

  • PHRM 501: Introduction to Seminar (1 CH)
  • PHRM 590: Readings or Research in Pharmacology (6 CH)
  • PHRM 599: Thesis Research - Thesis Defense (3 CH)

Elective Courses

  • PHRM 590: Readings or Research in Pharmacology (1-24 CH)
  • MBMB 530: Advanced Cellular Biology (Spring) (3 CH)
  • PHRM 560: Geriatric Pharmacology (3 CH)
  • PHRM 565: Principles of Toxicology (3 CH)
  • PHRM 577: Neuropharmacology (3 CH)
  • MBMB 555: Cardiovascular Pharmacology (3 CH)
  • MBMB 560: Molecular Oncology (3 CH)
  • Or other 500-level courses (3 CH)

Research Tools

  • PHRM 552: Applied Statistics for the Basic Sciences (3 CH)
  • MBMB 504: Research Methods (Fall) (3 CH)
  • PHRM 551: Methods in Pharmacology (4 CH)
  • PHRM 540: Responsible Conduct of Research (1 CH)

Summary of Requirements for Master of Science in Pharmacology and Neuroscience Degree

  1. Achievement of a grade point average of at least a 3.0 ( = 4.0)
  2. Achievement of B or better in each of the core courses, including 4 semesters of PHRM 501.
  3. Completion of PHRM 540 Responsible Conduct of Research.
  4. Completion of one additional research tool
  5. Completion of the comprehensive written exam with a grade of B or better.
  6. Informal thesis plan presented to thesis committee and interim meeting(s) with thesis committee to review progress.
  7. Submission of thesis to research advisor (10 weeks prior to the defense). Corrected thesis to thesis committee (four weeks prior to the defense).
  8. Submission of thesis abstract (two weeks prior to the defense)
  9. Oral presentation of the thesis research and successful defense of thesis
  10. Submission of approved thesis as an electronic file to the Graduate School, Graduate Program Director, and research advisor by the deadline posted in the university calendar.
  11. Submission of the department clearance form

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Pharmacology and Neuroscience

Requirements

  1. Completion of core coursework with a grade of B or better in each course, completion of PHRM 540 (Responsible Conduct of Research) and completion of at least two Research Tools.
  2. Completion of a comprehensive written preliminary examination with a grade of B or better. Students who do not pass the preliminary examination will be allowed to repeat it one time, no sooner than three months after the initial examination.
  3. The residency requirement for the Ph.D. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience degree must be fulfilled after admission to the doctoral program and before formal admission to doctoral candidacy. The residency requirement is satisfied by completion of 24 hours of graduate credit on campus as a Ph.D. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience student within a period not to exceed 4 calendar years. A Ph.D. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience student will not be permitted to count more than 6 credit hours of PHRM 600 (Dissertation Research) towards the 24 credit hour residency requirement. To meet the residency requirement, students may enroll in any other course that they have not taken that meets with the approval of their advisor and dissertation committee, e.g. any formal departmental or non-departmental courses and PHRM 590 (Readings or Research in Pharmacology).
  4. Admission to candidacy. The student is admitted to Ph.D. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience candidacy after having completed the residency requirement, the research tools requirement and the comprehensive written preliminary examination. Admission to candidacy is granted by the Dean of the Graduate School upon recommendation of the student’s dissertation committee or the Graduate Program Committee. The Ph.D. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience degree may not be conferred fewer than six months nor more than five years after admission to candidacy, except upon approval of the Dean of the Graduate School.
  5. After admission to candidacy, the student must complete 24 credit hours of PHRM 600 (Dissertation Research) to complete the dissertation research project and prepare the dissertation document to meet the requirements of the dissertation committee and the Graduate School. A student who has completed all formal course work, dissertation and candidacy credit requirements but has not completed and defended the dissertation must register for PHRM 601 (Continuing Enrollment) until completion of the degree.
  6. A dissertation proposal is required before the student begins significant research. The dissertation proposal should be written in the style of a NIH F31 grant with some modifications. An oral proposal will be presented as a seminar to the Department of Pharmacology. Immediately following this seminar, the proposal will be defended before the student’s dissertation committee. A cover sheet for the graduate student’s dissertation committee must be signed by all members of the student’s dissertation committee and filed with the Graduate Program Director.
  7. The student must meet formally with the dissertation committee at least once between defense of the proposal and the dissertation defense. The purpose of this interim meeting is to review progress and to modify the planned experiments, if deemed necessary. While not required, annual meetings with the dissertation committee is recommended.
  8. The dissertation defense and seminar will occur no earlier than one year after the dissertation proposal defense and after at least one primary research paper with the student as first author has been submitted for publication to a peer-reviewed journal. The dissertation is expected to be a competent, original research project that will make significant contribution to the body of scientific knowledge. It should include a statement of the problem, an adequate review of literature, a careful analysis of results by whatever methods are appropriate, and an interpretation of the findings.
  9. A preliminary draft of the dissertation should be given to the research advisor at least 10 weeks prior to the dissertation defense and a corrected copy should be submitted to other committee members no later than four weeks before the dissertation defense.
  10. Results of the dissertation research must be defended in a seminar which must be announced publicly in advance. Students should submit their dissertation abstract to the Graduate Program Director at least two weeks in advance of the dissertation defense to facilitate the public announcement. Any member of the University community may attend the dissertation seminar and may participate in the questioning and discussion, subject to reasonable time limitations imposed by the committee chair. Immediately following the dissertation seminar, a final oral examination will be conducted by the student’s dissertation committee. Only members of the committee may participate in the oral examination that occurs after the seminar and may vote or make recommendations concerning acceptance of the dissertation and final examination. A student will be recommended for the degree if members of the dissertation committee judge both the dissertation seminar and the performance at the final oral examination to be satisfactory. If approved, a dissertation approval form will be completed, signed by the committee, the Chair of the Department of Pharmacology and submitted to the Graduate School. In the case of failure of the oral examination, it may be repeated once, no sooner than three months after the first examination. Failure of the second examination will result in dismissal from the Pharmacology and Neuroscience Graduate Program. If the written dissertation is unsatisfactory, the student will be allowed to revise the document and send to either the research advisor only or the whole dissertation committee for review and approval.
  11. The student is responsible for electronically submitting the dissertation to the Graduate School, the Graduate Program Director, and their research advisor. The Department of Pharmacology will have 3 bound copies of the thesis made: for the student, the graduate program curriculum office, and the student’s research advisor.

Below is a representative schedule for the Ph.D. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience degree. Note that alternative scheduling is available for those students who already have a M.S. degree in Pharmacology and Neuroscience. In addition to the core courses, the advanced and elective courses will be offered. Students should take two advanced pharmacology courses and one elective course. Students are also strongly encouraged to start research as soon as possible by taking PHRM 590 (Readings or Research in Pharmacology).

Sample Curriculum Map

First Year, Fall Semester - 12 Credit Hours

  • PHRM 550A: Principles of Pharmacology (4 CH)
  • PHRM 577: Neuroscience (4 CH)
  • PHRM 501: Introduction to Seminar (1 CH)
  • MBMB 504: Research Methods (3 CH)

First Year, Spring Semester - 12 Credit Hours

  • PHRM 550B: Principles of Pharmacology (4 CH)
  • PHRM 530: Advanced Pharmacology and Neuroscience (3 CH)
  • PHRM 590: Readings or Research in Pharmacology (1 CH)
  • PHRM 501: Introduction to Seminar (1 CH)
  • MBMB 530: Advanced Cellular Biology (3 CH)

First Year, Summer Semester - 6 Credit Hours

  • PHRM 551: Methods in Pharmacology (4 CH)
  • PHRM 590: Readings or Research in Pharmacology (2 CH)
  • Choose Advisor and form dissertation committee
  • Preliminary Examination

Second Year, Fall Semester - 12 Credit Hours

  • PHRM 501: Introduction to Seminar (1 CH)
  • PHRM 552: Applied Statistics for the Basic Sciences (3 CH)
  • PHRM 590: Readings or Research in Pharmacology (5 CH)
  • PHRM 600: Dissertation Research (3)

Second Year, Spring Semester - 12 Credit Hours

  • PHRM 501: Introduction to Seminar (1 CH)
  • PHRM 590: Readings or Research in Pharmacology (8 CH)
  • PHRM 600: Dissertation Research (3 CH)
  • Admission to Candidacy when eligible

Second Year, Summer Semester - 6 Credit Hours

  • PHRM 600: Dissertation Research (6 CH)

After Second Year, Fall Semester - 6 Credit Hours

  • PHRM 600: Dissertation Research (5 CH)
  • PHRM 500: Pharmacology Seminar (1 CH)

After Second Year, Spring Semester - 6 Credit Hours

  • PHRM 600: Dissertation Research (5 CH)
  • PHRM 500: Pharmacology Seminar (1 CH)
  • Completion of residency requirements for Ph.D. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience

After Second Year, Summer Semester - 3 Credit Hours

  • PHRM 600: Dissertation Research (3 CH)

Elective Courses

  • PHRM 590: Readings or Research in Pharmacology (1-24 CH)
  • MBMB 504: Research Methods (Fall) (3 CH)
  • MBMB 530: Advanced Cellular Biology (Spring) (3 CH)
  • PHRM 574: Neuropharmacology (3 CH)
  • PHRM 555: Cardiovascular Pharmacology (3 CH)
  • PHRM 560: Geriatric Pharmacology (3 CH)
  • PHRM 565: Principles of Toxicology (3 CH)
  • MBMB 560: Molecular Oncology (3 CH)

Research Tools

  • PHRM 552: Applied Statistics for the Basic Sciences (3 CH)
  • MBMB 504: Research Methods (Fall) (3 CH)
  • PHRM 551: Methods in Pharmacology (4 CH)
  • PHRM 540: Responsible Conduct of Research (1 CH)

Summary of Requirements for Doctor of Philosophy in Pharmacology and Neuroscience Degree

  1. Achievement of a grade point average of at least 3.00 (A = 4.0)
  2. Completion of the core coursework with a grade of B or better, including 4 semesters of PHRM 501.
  3. 24 credit hours of residency
  4. Completion of PHRM 540 (Responsible Conduct of Research) and 2 additional Research Tools
  5. Completion of the comprehensive written preliminary exam of course work with a grade of B or better
  6. Admission to candidacy
  7. Successful oral defense of dissertation proposal and approval of the written dissertation proposal by the student’s dissertation committee.
  8. Completion of 24 hours of dissertation credit (PHRM 600)
  9. At least one meeting with dissertation committee after completion of the dissertation proposal and before the dissertation defense.
  10. Submission of at least one primary research manuscript, based on the student’s dissertation research, for publication to a peer-reviewed journal with the student as first author.
  11. Submission of dissertation to student’s research advisor with copies of publications or submitted manuscripts (10 weeks prior to defense)
  12. Corrected dissertation submitted to the dissertation committee (four weeks prior to defense)
  13. Submission of dissertation abstract (two weeks prior to the defense) for the public announcement of dissertation defense
  14. Successful oral defense of dissertation and approval of the written dissertation by the student’s dissertation committee.
  15. Submission of approved dissertation as an electronic file to Graduate School, graduate program office, and research advisor by the deadline posted in the university calendar.
  16. Submission of departmental clearance form