Curriculum and Instruction

Main Content

The School of Education offers three graduate degree programs in Curriculum and Instruction: the Master of Science in Education (M.S.Ed.) in Curriculum and Instruction, the Master in Teaching in Curriculum and Instruction Secondary Education (M.A.T.) and the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Education - Curriculum and Instruction. Those pursuing the M.S.Ed. must select either one of the program areas in Curriculum and Instruction or the concentration in Learning Systems Design and Technology. Those pursuing the Ph.D. must select from one of the following program areas: curriculum, instruction, and assessment; human development and family studies; language, literacies, and culture; STEM education; or teacher leadership.

Endorsements

The School of Education also offers State of Illinois endorsements as reading teachers and K-12 reading specialists. Endorsement opportunities are available to M.S.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction and Ph.D. in Education - Curriculum and Instruction candidates as part of their specialty area preparation. Endorsements in specific secondary level courses (e.g., chemistry, physics, and psychology) are also available. All such endorsements are arranged through the state and may require additional course work as well as a state-level transcript analysis.

Admission

Applicants for graduate programs must submit admission forms for both the Graduate School and the School of Education. General requirements for admission to graduate programs are provided by the Graduate School. A selection and review committee in the School of Education also screens applicants on the basis of prior undergraduate and graduate work, grade point average, as well as standardized test scores, work experience, and letters of recommendation as needed. The committee may recommend admission for candidates with specific academic deficiencies if, in its opinion, a candidate’s application materials demonstrate unusual professional promise.

Application materials may be obtained by addressing a request to: Coordinator of Graduate Studies, Curriculum and Instruction, Mail Code 4610, Southern Illinois University, 625 Wham Drive, Carbondale, IL  62901. Specific information may be obtained by calling 618-536-2441 or by emailing currinst@siu.edu. All programs require a nonrefundable $65 application fee that must be submitted with the application for Admission to Graduate Study in Curriculum and Instruction. Applicants must pay this fee by credit card.   

Master of Science in Education (M.S.Ed.) in Curriculum and Instruction

The Master of Science in Education degree in Curriculum and Instruction requires the completion of a minimum of 32 or 36 credit hours of course work, depending on the research requirement selected. At least 15 of the required credit hours must be at the 500 level and taken at SIU. The student must also meet Curriculum and Instruction core course requirements, research requirements, and program area requirements. No more than six hours of credit earned at another institution may be accepted toward this degree. It is recommended that transfer courses be from institutions accredited by national organizations (i.e., CAEP, NCATE, or TEAC). All transfer credit hours must be approved by the coordinator of graduate studies.

Each candidate’s program is planned in consultation with a faculty adviser from the specialty area selected by the student, with consideration for the student’s interests, experience, and specialty area. Nondeclared graduate students are advised to consult with the department chair concerning admission to the M.S.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction program.

Admission and Retention

Admission to the M.S.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction program requires a 2.7 GPA for the last 60 credit hours of the bachelor’s degree as well as the recommendation of the program area faculty. A TOEFL score of at least 550 (220 computerized score) is also required for international students and must be no more than two years old. Students must maintain an overall 3.0 graduate GPA to be retained in the M.S.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction program. The progress of each student is reviewed periodically. Students who do not make satisfactory progress, or who violate the regulations of the department, college, or university may be dropped from the program.

Program Requirements

The M.S.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction requires a nine-credit hour professional core, curriculum and instruction cohort courses (12 to 15 credit hours) and five elective courses in a focus area. The professional core consists of CI 500, Research Methods in Education; CI 503, Introduction to the Curriculum; and CI 504, Systematic Approaches to Instruction. All professional core courses must be completed with a grade of C or better, and an overall grade point average of 3.0 must be obtained for the professional core. The focus area program consists of either 13 credit hours of coursework including a thesis or 15 credit hours of coursework. The minimum number of required credit hours is 32 for students completing a thesis or 36 for students completing the coursework only option.

The M.S.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction with a concentration in Learning Systems Design and Technology (LSDT) prepares professionals who use research-based practice to create effective learning and performance support systems utilizing communications technology in educational institutions at all levels as well as non-school, government and business settings. Competencies developed include those employed in online, distance or e-learning, learning within virtual or simulated environments such as games and simulation, content management systems, and traditional classroom environments. A core of seven courses (21 credit hours) is required; students consult with their advisors to select additional, elective courses. At least 15 credit hours must be at the 500-level and taken at SIU. All professional core courses must be completed with a grade of C or better, and an overall grade point average of 3.0 must be obtained for the professional core. Opportunities for practicum, internship, and either a research paper or thesis are available. The minimum number of required credit hours is 32 for students completing a thesis or 36 for students completing the coursework only option.

LSD&T Required Courses (21 Credit Hours)

  • CI 541: Foundations of Instructional Design & Technology
  • CI 504: Systematic Approaches to Instruction
  • CI 558: Instructional Development Studio I
  • CI 557: Task Analysis and Systematic Design of Instruction
  • CI 540: Learning Models for Instructional Design
  • CI 553: Consulting in Learning Systems Design & Technology -OR-
  • CI 484: Interactive Multimedia for Learning
  • CI 500: Introduction to Research Methods in Education

LSD&T Elective Courses (15 Credit Hours)

  • CI 556: Virtual and Simulated Learning
  • CI 562: Social and Informal Learning
  • CI 581: Digital Video Production
  • CI 591: Web Resources for Teachers
  • CI 588: Design and Delivery of e-Learning
  • CI 563: Instructional and Human Performance Technology
  • CI 596: Interactive Multimedia for Learning
  • CI 498N: Workshop in Educational Technology
  • CI 551: Assessment and Learning Using Virtual Environments
  • CI 555: Instructional Message Design
  • CI 587: Evaluating Learning and Instructional Programs
  • CI 560: Content and Learning Management Systems for e-Learning
  • CI 559: Advanced Instructional Development Studio II
  • CI 585N: Topical Seminar in Educational Technology
  • CI 595N: Internship: Educational Technology

Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) in Curriculum Instruction Secondary Education

SIU's Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) in Curriculum Instruction Secondary Education program is a degree program intended for persons who have successfully completed an undergraduate degree (Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, or Bachelor of Fine Arts) in the liberal arts or sciences and desire to pursue licensure for teaching at the secondary school level. Those enrolled engage in a year-long internship (two semesters) in a public school setting while also completing University-based studies culminating in the Master's degree. The M.A.T. in Curriculum Instruction Secondary Education is designed as a high-quality, technology-rich, accelerated teacher license program; time-to-degree is approximately fifteen (15) months, including one full academic year and two adjacent or contiguous summer sessions of course work. Those holding undergraduate degrees in teacher education are ineligible for this program.

M.A.T. in Curriculum Instruction Secondary Education candidates select a subject area most compatible with coursework in the major content area that was completed during a bachelor's degree program. Secondary subject area options include:

  • English Language Arts
  • Mathematics
  • Science-Biology
  • Science-Chemistry
  • Social Science-History

Upon graduation from the program, candidates will be licensed to teach in a school system in Illinois or in a state offering reciprocity. They will be broadly prepared in their content areas and will possess leadership experience pertinent to the public school setting. M.A.T. in Curriculum Instruction Secondary Education candidates advance through the program as members of an interdisciplinary cohort of no more than 25 students and are required to work collaboratively within that cohort to investigate and make recommendations about school-based programs and issues using action research methodologies.

Admission

Admission to the M.A.T. in Curriculum Instruction Secondary Education program is highly competitive. Applicants with undergraduate content area backgrounds in areas currently experiencing national teacher shortages will receive priority in admission decisions, but other applicants meeting admission requirements will be considered. In addition to materials required for general admission to the School of Education and the Graduate School, M.A.T. in Curriculum Instruction Secondary Education applicants must submit: (1) a résumé; (2) original letters of reference from two persons familiar with the candidate's undergraduate performance or who can comment specifically about the candidate's ability to succeed in an accelerated graduate-level degree program; (3) an overall undergraduate grade point average of 2.75 (based on a 4.00 scale). In the case of graduate students who have completed 12 or more credit hours of graduate level course work, the graduate GPA is used, and it must meet or exceed 3.00 (based on a 4.00 scale).

M.A.T. in Curriculum Instruction Secondary Education Admissions Committee members consider a candidate's undergraduate major, past performance in the content area for which licensure is sought, performance in other relevant course work, professional experience, strength of recommendations, test results, and any available anecdotal information in prioritizing candidates for acceptance to the program. In years where the number of qualified candidates exceeds the program's capacity to handle projected enrollment numbers, candidates may be asked to attend an interview for use in making final selection decisions. When space is available in any cohort, non-declared graduate students may be permitted to enroll in M.A.T. in Curriculum Instruction Secondary Education courses offered during summer 1; continued enrollment in M.A.T. in Curriculum Instruction Secondary Education related course work as a non-declared graduate student, however, is contingent on meeting or exceeding published admission criteria and obtaining full admission status. Contingent enrollment may be offered by the M.A.T. in Curriculum Instruction Secondary Education Admissions Committee in extenuating circumstances but is not guaranteed and does not constitute a promise of admission to the M.A.T. in Curriculum Instruction Secondary Education program.

Retention and Graduation

Students in the M.A.T. in Curriculum Instruction Secondary Education program are expected to complete the degree in two intersession/summer terms and one academic year, although variations in this progression are occasionally necessary. To complete degree requirements within the normal 15 months sequence, candidates enroll in blocks of courses with the following suggested sequence. The candidate must complete the appropriate state content test and the edTPA or equivalent state licensure requirements.

Intersession 1:

  • CI 543: Fundamentals of Teaching and Learning (3 CH)

Summer 1:

  • CI 500: Introduction to Research Methods in Education (3 CH)
  • SPED 408: Characteristics and Methods for Teaching Exceptional Children (3 CH)
  • CI 561: Literacy Instruction for Secondary and Adult Education (3 CH)

Fall:

  • CI 544: Action Research Methods (3 CH)
  • CI 545: Literacy Instruction for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students (3 CH)
  • EDUC 500: Clinical Experiences in Teaching (3 CH)
  • Content area Methods (3-6 CH)
  • Content Area Elective (3-4 CH)1  

Spring:

  • EDUC 501: M.A.T. Graduate Student Teaching (6 CH)
  • Content Area Elective (3 CH)1

Intersession 2:

  • CI 571: Secondary School Curriculum (3 CH)

Summer 2:

  • CI 574: Advanced Teaching Methods (3 CH)
  • CI 533: Instructional Leadership (Teacher Leadership) (3 CH)
  • CI 549: New Literacies & Emerging Technologies in a Participatory Culture (3 CH)

To remain in the program, M.A.T. in Curriculum Instruction Secondary Education candidates must maintain in a minimum overall grade point average of 3.00 and obtain successful summative evaluations at the completion of EDUC 500 and EDUC 501. To graduate, the candidate must: (1) prepare and share publicly a professional portfolio to demonstrate professional growth throughout the degree program; (2) achieve the equivalent of a 3.00 GPA in EDUC 500 and EDUC 501; and (3) successfully complete the edTPA or equivalent state licensure requirements.

1Content area methods and elective courses vary by area of concentration and credit hour assignment and must be approved by the M.A.T. in Curriculum Instruction Secondary Education Coordinator. In addition, they may or may not carry graduate credit, but are required for program completion and licensure.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Education - Curriculum and Instruction

The Doctor of Philosophy in Education degree in Education - Curriculum and Instruction is designed for teachers and other educational personnel who seek to improve their performance in general and specialized areas in either the public schools or the private sector. This program is designed for students who desire positions requiring advanced preparation at the highest level with emphasis on theories of curriculum and instruction and in-depth preparation in research. For example, this program is oriented toward students who aspire to positions with institutions of higher education, state departments of education in the United States, ministries of education in foreign countries, educational sections of human service agencies, business and industry, and public schools.

Admission

In addition to the application for admission to the Graduate School, the applicant must also complete the departmental application for admission to the concentration and the related program area. A selection and review committee screens the applicant on the basis of prior graduate work, grade point average, standardized test scores (Graduate Record Examination), research ability, work experience, and letters of recommendation. A TOEFL score of at least 550 is required for international students and must be no more than two years old. The GRE score must be no more than five years old. The selection committee recommends admission of the student only if the program area has a faculty member who is qualified to direct dissertations and who agrees to serve as chair of the student’s doctoral committee.

The admissions committee may possibly recommend a student for admission who shows some deviation from departmental standards if, in the committee’s opinion, the student shows unusual professional promise.

Retention

Any prospective doctoral candidate with a grade point average of less than 3.25 and 20 credit hours of doctoral work will not be allowed to continue in the program and will not be re-admitted at a later date. Students must accumulate an overall grade point average of 3.50 for all doctoral work to qualify to take the preliminary examination.

Prior to the completion of 30 credit hours of course work, students meet with their major professors to determine whether or not to continue as doctoral students. Such matters as grade point average, progress in the program, course completion, motivation, general academic scholarship, and skills in writing and research are considered. A report is then made to the doctoral committee and the department chair. Students who are not making satisfactory progress or who violate the regulations of the program, college, or university, may be dropped from the program.

Program Requirements

The concentration in Curriculum and Instruction has requirements at the school and program level. A minimum of 72 credit hours beyond the master’s degree is required. The School of Education professional core of at least six credit hours consists of EDUC 510, Introduction to Doctoral Studies in Education, and either EDUC 511, Doctoral Seminar in Philosophical and Cultural Foundations of Education, or EDUC 512, Doctoral Seminar in Behavioral and Cognitive Foundations of Education.

The Curriculum and Instruction requirements include a core of nine credit hours; at least 24 credit hours in the selected program area; research tools totaling at least nine credit hours; and a minimum of 24 credit hours of dissertation. An internship of two to eight credit hours is highly recommended. Courses comprising program area credit hours other than the core courses are determined by the student and the doctoral committee. No more than six hours of credit earned at another institution may be accepted toward this degree. It is recommended that transfer courses be from institutions accredited by national organizations (i.e., CAEP, NCATE, or TEAC). All transfer credits must be approved by the coordinator of the student’s program area. The professional core of courses in the Curriculum and Instruction concentration includes: CI 582, Advanced Research Methods in Education; CI 583, Instructional Theory, Principles, and Practices; and CI 584, Curriculum Theory, Foundations, and Principles. All professional core courses must be completed with a grade of C or better, and an overall grade point average of 3.0 must be obtained for the professional core.

Research Requirements

The Ph.D. in Education - Curriculum and Instruction is a research-oriented degree. Each doctoral student in education must successfully complete three credit hours of Introduction to Qualitative Research (EAHE 587) and three credit hours of Introduction to Quantitative Research in Education (EDUC 505). In addition, each student must complete a minimum of one other three-credit course on research methods (also referred to as “research tool”). Students with previous coursework in introductory research methods can petition to replace these introductory courses with higher-level research methodology coursework. A list of approved research tool courses for the Ph.D. in Education - Curriculum and Instruction degree is available in the Ph.D. Policies and Procedures Manual of the College of Education and Human Services.

Preliminary Examination

The preparation and direction of the preliminary examination are the responsibility of the program area faculty and the student’s doctoral committee. Concepts related to curriculum, instruction, and research/evaluation will be integrated into the preliminary examination. Additional oral and written examinations may be required by the student’s doctoral committee.

The examination is offered at least 2 times a year: during the fifth week of the term, as decided by the program area. A student may take the examination no more than 3 times.

Prospectus, Dissertation, and Final Oral Examination

Students may not register for more than 6 dissertation credit hours until they have been advanced to candidacy. Having been admitted to candidacy, students submit prospectuses to their doctoral committees for approval. The dissertation must show high attainment in an independent, original, scholarly, and creative effort. A student’s dissertation will be circulated to members of the doctoral committee at least two weeks in advance of the proposed defense.

The Curriculum and Instruction program requires an oral examination conducted by the doctoral committee. Oral examinations are open to all interested observers. Notice of the time and place of the examination and the abstract of the dissertation are circulated throughout the program and the School.

Certificate in Gerontology

The Curriculum and Instruction program offers courses that satisfy the requirements in the Certificate in Gerontology interdisciplinary program. For more information on the Certificate program, please see the Post-Baccalaureate Certificate Programs tab.